Whether you have five minutes or a few hours, get the facts on water quality and filter testing in the U.S.

 

FEATURED RESOURCES

FIVE-MINUTE READS

On Water Quality:

Common Waterborne Contaminants, Water Quality Association
It’s bad enough to be able to see, smell, or taste a contaminant. But what if your water looks, smells, and tastes just fine — is it? Not necessarily. Microbial and organic contaminants cannot always be detected by human senses. You might go years before realizing a problem exists.

What you need to know about water filters to remove lead, USA Today
If you’re not confident the drinking water in your home is lead free, consider buying a water filter or other treatment device. Before you purchase a water-treatment device, experts recommend getting a water-quality report from your utility, then having a certified lab test your home’s water.

On Testing and Standards:

Water Treatment Systems Certification Process, NSF International
To earn NSF certification, water treatment systems must undergo extensive testing to confirm that they meet the strict requirements of NSF/ANSI Drinking Water Treatment standards.

On the Rise of Counterfeit Filters:

You won’t believe these everyday items are knock offs, CNN Money
Toothpaste. Contact lenses. Water filters. Wine. Scammers aren’t just ripping off expensive designer clothes and watches anymore. They’ve turned to more mundane items that are probably on your grocery list or in your medicine cabinet.

Where are fake goods seized in U.S. coming from?, The Republic
Customs and Border Protection’s more than 21,000 officers face a torrent of imports every day as they search for counterfeit goods.

IN-DEPTH RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS

On Water Quality:

America’s water crisis goes beyond Flint, Michigan, CNBC
America’s water issues extend far beyond the current crisis in Flint, Michigan — and it’s going to take a massive infrastructure investment to protect citizens from serious public health dangers, say experts.

Millions in U.S. Drink Dirty Water, Records Show, New York Times

More than 20 percent of the nation’s water treatment systems have violated key provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act over the last five years, according to a New York Times analysis of federal data.

On Testing and Standards:

Consumer Confidence Reports (CCR), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
EPA requires community water systems to deliver a Consumer Confidence Report, also known as an annual drinking water quality report, to their customers. These reports provide Americans information about their local drinking water quality.

Consumer Guide to NSF International Certified Lead Filtration Devices, NSF International
NSF created this guide to list all NSF-certified filters for lead reduction in drinking water and explain the NSF standards and the process by which it verifies a filter’s ability to reduce lead in drinking water.

TRUSTED SOURCES FOR FURTHER READING

NSF International

Water Quality Association

IAPMO R&T

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Safe Drinking Water Hotline (EPA)

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

 

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